Videos on Immortality

The following are some of the available videos on video sharing sites such as Youtube about the subjects of longevity and regenerative medicine. Most of these videos contain individual insights and footages from lectures and academic forums.

Speaker: Dr Aubrey de Grey
Aubrey de Grey is a biomedical gerontologist based in Cambridge, UK,
and is the Chairman and Chief Science Officer of the Methuselah
Foundation

The Health Medicine Forum Presents
Anti-Aging Strategies: Balancing Diet, Exercise and Hormones
Featuring Frank Shallenberger, MD, HMD and Meg Jordan, PhD, RN
November 19, 2002, Oakland, CA.

Gordon Lithgow is a Professor and the head of the Lithgow Lab at the Buck Institute for Age Research. His research is focused on the relationship between stress and aging by studying genes that effect lifespan and an animal's ability to resist stress. His lab is also investigating the mechanisms of chemical compounds that extend lifespan. These compounds also suppress disease-related features during worm aging. In addition, we are studying the role of protein aggreagtion in determining lifespan.

A lecture on DNA Damage and Repair taken from the Molecular Genetics module at the University of Bradford.

Surgeon Anthony Atala demonstrates an early-stage experiment that could someday solve the organ-donor problem: a 3D printer that uses living cells to output a transplantable kidney. Using similar technology, Dr. Atala's young patient Luke Massella received an engineered bladder 10 years ago; we meet him onstage.

In this episode of Breakthrough Medicine, experts from the University of Miami's Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute (ISCI) use adult stem cells to repair organs and save lives.
In this episode of Breakthrough Medicine, experts from the University of Miami's Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute (ISCI) use adult stem cells to repair organs and save lives. A heart attack victim receives his own stem cells in hopes of repairing his damaged heart muscle, and after all other methods have failed, patients with chronic wounds turn to a revolutionary study that heals broken skin.

What you need to know about resveratrol in wine. Randy Alvarez interviews Medical Doctor and owner of Torii Mor Winery in Willamette Oregon about longevity.

Ben Goertzel speaks about the Singularity, what it is, road maps, the risks and the benefits etc.

"The Future of Medicine" workshop facilitated by Dr. Michio Kaku for the University of Rhode Island's 15th Annual Diversity Week.

Lawrence Goldstein, Distinguished Professor in the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine and the Department of Neurosciences at UCSD School of Medicine, as well as the Director of the UCSD Stem Cell Program, discusses the basic principles of stem cells. He examines the promise they offer and how they can be safely and effectively employed. Series: "Stein Institute for Research on Aging"

A lecture on "The Science of Weight Loss" from the Life Extension Nutrition Center's Grand Opening celebration, featuring Life Extension's Dr. Stacy Nottingham.

Regeneration has fascinated philosophers and scientists since the beginning of history. The wide but uneven distribution of regenerative capacities among multicellular organisms is puzzling, and the permissive/inhibitory mechanisms regulating this attribute in animals remain a mystery. In the first part of this lecture, I will provide a general history of regeneration research from ancient Greece to the beginning of the 20th century. Key concepts will be introduced in their appropriate historical context, and many of the unanswered questions put forward by the problem of regeneration will be discussed

Cryonics involves the cryopreservation of humans as soon as possible after legal and clinical "death". Legal and clinical death differ importantly from biological death or true (irreversible) cessation of function. It is therefore a mistake to portray cryonics as an alternative to cremation or burial. It is true that cryopreserved people are not alive but neither are they dead. Cryonics should be seen as part of the field of life extension. Cryonics enables the transport of critically ill people through time in an unchanging state to a time when more advanced medical and repair technologies are available. Even after "longevity escape velocity" has been attained and aging has been largely tamed, cryonics will continue to be needed for people who die of accidents or diseases for which there is no cure at the time.

This holiday season give yourself the gift of good health and check out the latest breakthroughs in Russian medical science. Russia's leading cardiovascular center tests out a brand new artificial heart valve that combines the best of the biological and mechanical worlds. Dental surgery is no longer such a headache with the latest laser scalpel developed in St. Petersburg. Fancy living forever? A Moscow State University professor thinks he might have found the key to giving Father Time the slip, at least temporarily. And see how doctors use state-of-the-art simulators to hone their skills out in innovation-obsessed Kazan.

Nir Barzilai, M.D., discusses the Longevity Genes Project and his quest to find ways to delay the aging process. Dr. Barzilai is director of the Institute for Aging Research at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and an attending physician at Montefiore Medical Center.

It may seem premature to be discussing approaches to the effective elimination of human aging as a cause of death at a time when essentially no progress has yet been made in even postponing it. However, two aspects of human aging combine to undermine this assessment. The first is that aging is happening to us throughout our lives but only results in appreciable functional decline after four or more decades of life: this shows that we can postpone the functional decline caused by aging arbitrarily well without knowing how to prevent aging completely, but instead by increasingly thorough molecular and cellular repair. The second is that the typical rate of refinement of dramatic technological breakthroughs is rather reliable (so long as public enthusiasm for them is abundant) and is fast enough to change such technologies (be they in medicine, transport, or computing) almost beyond recognition within a natural human lifespan. In this talk I will explain, first, why (presuming adequate funding for the initial preclinical work) therapies that can add 30 healthy years to the remaining lifespan of healthy 55-year-olds may arrive within the next few decades, and, second, why those who benefit from those therapies will very probably continue to benefit from progressively improved therapies indefinitely and thus avoid debilitation or death from age-related causes at any age.

Hank introduces us to another amazing organism - the "immortal jellyfish," Turritopsis dohrnii - and explains how it can extend its life cycle indefinitely through a process known as transdifferentiation.

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